Posts Tagged ‘jonwyatt.co.uk’

‘Bamboo (Six Seconds)’ project featured in Orion Magazine

Wednesday, April 1st, 2015

 

A bamboo forest in China from the project on deforestation and bamboo production called Bamboo (Six Seconds) featured in Orion Magazine by photographer Jon Wyatt

 

Orion Magazine is one of the oldest and most respected environmental and cultural magazines in the US and their May/June issue which is out today features my ‘Bamboo (Six Seconds)’ project. The images are beautifully laid out over five pages in a great looking edition ( I would say that..) which also includes, for those of you into the language of landscape, an extract from Robert Macfarlane’s new book, Landmarks.

Every image in the ‘Bamboo (Six Seconds)’ project has an exposure time of six seconds. This idea came from a quote I read that every six seconds fifteen acres of the planet is deforested. The full project statement continues:-

To the Chinese, bamboo holds iconic status, representing the harmony between nature and man – and symbolising civilisation. In myths, literature, calligraphy and painting bamboo’s characteristics embody the finest human virtues – integrity, humility and purity. Comparing a person to bamboo is considered the highest possible praise of their character.

Touted as a miracle crop to counter deforestation, bamboo is one of the fastest growing plants on earth. Growing up to four feet a day, one hectare of bamboo sequesters sixty-two tons of carbon dioxide per year. Generating up to 35% more oxygen than an equivalent stand of trees it can be used to produce everything from food, fabrics, paper, building material and oil.

However rising demand from the west has brought new environmental concerns for bamboo forests. Increased use of unregulated pesticides for production plus the strong chemical solvents required to process the bamboo have poisoned watercourses and threaten precious animal habitat. Indiscriminate harvesting has resulted in half the world’s species of bamboo now being in imminent danger of extinction.

A bamboo forest in China from the project on deforestation and bamboo production called Bamboo (Six Seconds) featured in Orion Magazine by photographer Jon Wyatt

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New work: ‘Fault Line’

Friday, March 27th, 2015

Climbing vines in Samoa, from the project Fault Line by photographer Jon Wyatt

Civilisation exists by geological consent, subject to change without notice. – Will Durant.

On the wall is a bathymetric map – a map of the topography of a section of the Pacific Ocean floor 2,500 miles east of Australia. Intricate, black wrinkles spread across the map denoting the contours and pressure ridges of the ocean landscape. At a depth of 11 miles those contours coalesce to form a thick, dark crease across the map. At this spot the Pacific tectonic plate dives below the Australian plate at an average of 10 inches per year – by far the fastest plate movement on the planet.

In 2009, in a massive fault rupture, the plates moved 22 feet relative to each other for a distance of 155 miles. The resulting wave was 55 feet high when it hit the nearest coastline – the island of Samoa, 100 miles to the north. It killed 189 people, destroyed 20 villages and left 3000 homeless.

Climbing vines in Samoa, from the project Fault Line by photographer Jon Wyatt

Detail from above image

Visiting Samoa in 2014, I’m struck by the swathes of vegetation that rise, several storeys high, from the roadsides. Comprising one single species – Merremia Peltata – this fast-growing climbing vine with broad, waxy leaves has smothered and killed more than 60% of Samoa’s native forest. The contours of the carpet of vines recalls the contours of the ocean floor map. An inundation of vegetation. A palpable echo of the tsunami.

Climbing vines in Samoa, from the project Fault Line by photographer Jon Wyatt.

Sixth Extinction project is featured in ‘Another Place’ magazine

Saturday, January 31st, 2015
Dunraven Bay, South Wales. The large 'imbricated' boulders scattered above the high tide mark are evidence of the UK's largest natural disaster. In 1607 a 25-foot high tsunami swept up the Bristol Channel killing 3000 people and flooding a 200 square mile wide area in North Somerset and South Wales

Dunraven Bay, South Wales. The large ‘imbricated’ boulders scattered above the high tide mark are evidence of the UK’s largest natural disaster. In 1607 a 25-foot high tsunami swept up the Bristol Channel killing 3000 people and flooding a 200 square mile wide area in North Somerset and South Wales

‘The Sixth Extinction’ project is featured this week in the ‘Another Place’ contemporary photography magazine on tumblr – here.  The project concerns ecosystem transition and is loosely based around the investigations of a group of scientists into a 200 million year old mystery – a mass extinction event which wiped out around 80% of all life on earth.

Bamboo (Six Seconds) featured on hereontheweb.co.uk blog

Friday, May 20th, 2011

Untitled III from the series 'Bamboo (Six Seconds)' - featured on hereontheweb.co.uk blog

Hereontheweb.co.uk (now Herepress.org) is the new(ish) blog from photo editor, writer and curator Harry Hardie. Until recently Exhibitions Director at Host Gallery/Foto8 in London, Harry is now director of ‘Here’, a company that publishes, exhibits, teaches and supports photography. He is featuring the ‘Bamboo (Six Seconds)’ project.

Bamboo (Six Seconds) – a new series

Thursday, May 19th, 2011

Untitled I, from the series Bamboo (Six Seconds)

Every six seconds fifteen acres of the planet are deforested. That’s 60,000 sqm, or six hectares, or nine football pitches. Every six seconds….the time it’s taken you to read these words. Shot in a bamboo forest in Anhui Province, China, the exposure time of each of these images is six seconds.

For the Chinese bamboo holds iconic status, representing the harmony between nature and man – and symbolising civilisation. In folklore, literature, calligraphy and painting bamboo’s characteristics embody the finest human virtues – integrity, humility and purity. Comparing a person to bamboo is the highest possible praise of their character.

Touted as a miracle crop to counter deforestation, bamboo is one of the fastest growing plants on earth. Growing up to four feet a day, one hectare of bamboo sequesters sixty-two tons of carbon dioxide per year. Generating up to 35% more oxygen than an equivalent stand of trees it can be used to produce everything from food, fabrics, paper, building material and oil.

However rising demand from the west has brought new environmental concerns for bamboo forests. Increased use of unregulated pesticides for production plus the strong chemical solvents required to process the bamboo have poisoned watercourses and threaten precious animal habitat. Indiscriminate harvesting has resulted in half the world’s species of bamboo now being in imminent danger of extinction.

For more from the series go to my portfolio website here, or on this permanent gallery page on this blog.

Images and Prints available from Lensmodern

Tuesday, May 17th, 2011
Glacier d'Argentiere, Chamonix. Images and Prints available from Lensmodern

Glacier d’Argentiere, Chamonix.

I am pleased to announce that i have been invited to contribute images to Lensmodern. Lensmodern is an online photographic handling agency and library which was “conceived and created by a group of the world’s top photographers as the only marketplace appropriate for their award-winning work. Lensmodern provides the perfect environment in which to view, sample, license usage, or buy fine art prints of some of the world’s most creative photographic images.”

Selected photographs from my ‘Naked’ series are now available through Lensmodern as fine art prints or available for licensing. The ‘Naked’ series features snowscapes photographed in mountain ranges on several different continents.

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Artist Statement

Saturday, March 26th, 2011

My two recent projects – ‘Huangshan Ltd’ and ‘Bamboo (Six Seconds)’ – mark a slight shift in emphasis in my work – though the progression to this point is clear from a stroll through my ‘generic’ portfolios – ‘land’, ‘sea’ etc. Both projects also share a framework which I intend to continue to pursue in the future. Below is my ‘artist statement’ which should explain all.

Artist Statement

Historically cultures have turned to their natural environment as a source of inspiration for collective identification. Myths, memories and cultural virtues are projected onto the landscape which acquires iconic status, becoming imbued with moral and spiritual significance. Increasingly though, these bonds between a culture and its physical landscape are becoming eroded as we adapt the environment to our own ends rather than allowing it to shape who we are.

My work documents this rift, using natural ‘tools’ within the landscape to articulate this growing spiritual and cultural detachment. These devices have included invasive vines (Fault Line), atmospheric phenomena (Huangshan Ltd) and time itself (Bamboo (Six Seconds)). Hushed rhythms of meditative beauty are used to engage the viewer with disquieting issues and ideas, asking them to re-evaluate our culture’s changed and fraught relationship with the land. Powerful places are quietly told, the landscapes mediated by unease. The projects, through the lens of landscape iconography, address issues of conservation and ecology, ecosystem transition and the ethics of land use and ownership.

 

www.jonwyatt.co.uk

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Isle of Jura in the Scottish Inner Hebrides

Saturday, January 8th, 2011

Isle of Jura in the Scottish Inner Hebrides

I’ve recently returned from 2 weeks on the Isle of Jura in the Scottish Inner Hebrides. Many thanks to Jane and Hugh who looked after us so well, their idyllic cottage providing stunning views of the Paps – ‘mountains’ rising to 785m at their highest point.

Isle of Jura in the Scottish Inner Hebrides

The island’s relatively small but boggy interior and remote nature (two ferries from the Scottish mainland) combined with extraordinary light, meant I found myself drawn to the views over the Sound of Jura. These are the straits separating the island from the Scottish mainland, which, draped in ethereal light, are known intriguingly in Gaelic as ‘An Linne Rosach’ –  ‘The Sound of Disappointment’. The full series is now up on my portfolio website.

New jonwyatt.co.uk website

Monday, June 8th, 2009

My new website and blog are now launched. For my current projects and commissioned work go to the ‘portfolio‘ section. If you like what you see head to the contact page and sign up for my occasional email newsletters. This blog will contain info on current shoots and commissions, examples of new work and act as an archive of my ‘news’ stories from my previous website. Any thoughts or comments on the work are always welcome.