Posts Tagged ‘forest’

Recent iphone hipstamatic images

Sunday, June 12th, 2016

I’ve taken a bit of a sabbatical recently for personal reasons, but I’ve always got my iphone on me and take images using the hipstamatic app. Walking, shooting and finding solace in the forests of Dartmoor and Bodmin Moor.

 

‘Bamboo (Six Seconds)’ project featured in Orion Magazine

Wednesday, April 1st, 2015

 

A bamboo forest in China from the project on deforestation and bamboo production called Bamboo (Six Seconds) featured in Orion Magazine by photographer Jon Wyatt

 

Orion Magazine is one of the oldest and most respected environmental and cultural magazines in the US and their May/June issue which is out today features my ‘Bamboo (Six Seconds)’ project. The images are beautifully laid out over five pages in a great looking edition ( I would say that..) which also includes, for those of you into the language of landscape, an extract from Robert Macfarlane’s new book, Landmarks.

Every image in the ‘Bamboo (Six Seconds)’ project has an exposure time of six seconds. This idea came from a quote I read that every six seconds fifteen acres of the planet is deforested. The full project statement continues:-

To the Chinese, bamboo holds iconic status, representing the harmony between nature and man – and symbolising civilisation. In myths, literature, calligraphy and painting bamboo’s characteristics embody the finest human virtues – integrity, humility and purity. Comparing a person to bamboo is considered the highest possible praise of their character.

Touted as a miracle crop to counter deforestation, bamboo is one of the fastest growing plants on earth. Growing up to four feet a day, one hectare of bamboo sequesters sixty-two tons of carbon dioxide per year. Generating up to 35% more oxygen than an equivalent stand of trees it can be used to produce everything from food, fabrics, paper, building material and oil.

However rising demand from the west has brought new environmental concerns for bamboo forests. Increased use of unregulated pesticides for production plus the strong chemical solvents required to process the bamboo have poisoned watercourses and threaten precious animal habitat. Indiscriminate harvesting has resulted in half the world’s species of bamboo now being in imminent danger of extinction.

A bamboo forest in China from the project on deforestation and bamboo production called Bamboo (Six Seconds) featured in Orion Magazine by photographer Jon Wyatt

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Bamboo (Six Seconds) – a new series

Thursday, May 19th, 2011

Untitled I, from the series Bamboo (Six Seconds)

Every six seconds fifteen acres of the planet are deforested. That’s 60,000 sqm, or six hectares, or nine football pitches. Every six seconds….the time it’s taken you to read these words. Shot in a bamboo forest in Anhui Province, China, the exposure time of each of these images is six seconds.

For the Chinese bamboo holds iconic status, representing the harmony between nature and man – and symbolising civilisation. In folklore, literature, calligraphy and painting bamboo’s characteristics embody the finest human virtues – integrity, humility and purity. Comparing a person to bamboo is the highest possible praise of their character.

Touted as a miracle crop to counter deforestation, bamboo is one of the fastest growing plants on earth. Growing up to four feet a day, one hectare of bamboo sequesters sixty-two tons of carbon dioxide per year. Generating up to 35% more oxygen than an equivalent stand of trees it can be used to produce everything from food, fabrics, paper, building material and oil.

However rising demand from the west has brought new environmental concerns for bamboo forests. Increased use of unregulated pesticides for production plus the strong chemical solvents required to process the bamboo have poisoned watercourses and threaten precious animal habitat. Indiscriminate harvesting has resulted in half the world’s species of bamboo now being in imminent danger of extinction.

For more from the series go to my portfolio website here, or on this permanent gallery page on this blog.

New series of black and white prints from Slovakia

Wednesday, June 24th, 2009

New series of black and white prints from Slovakia

Taken in the High Tatra mountain range, this series shows the devastation wreaked by a freak storm in November 2004. Winds reaching a speed of 180 km/h (112mph) literally flattened 13000 hectares of forest on the south-eastern slopes of the High Tatras National Park, leaving bare a strip of land between 2.5 km wide and 50 km long. According to a World Wildlife Fund report, ‘the volume of fallen timber is estimated variously at 4 to 5 million cubic meters’.

This haunting and desolate area has changed little since that time. The first two images below show the strip of flattened forest and the second two show a wooden luge track devastated by huge trees which smashed through its banking. The area has suffered from government-sanctioned salvage logging of the fallen trees, despite evidence provided by NGO’s and environmental groups which clearly shows that this kind of logging can cause even greater ecological damage than the storm itself.

Worryingly the ‘Governmental Committee for Restoration and Development of the High Tatras has declared that the restoration of forests should be planned in a way to ‘use this catastrophe for a change in landscape planning and for building new facilities’. And that ‘the government, the committee and its expert groups will not really take in consideration the opinion of nature conservationists and NGO’s’….