Posts Tagged ‘extinction’

Selected for University of Exeter Open Exhibition – ‘Observatory: Perspectives on Landscape, Society and Spirit’

Wednesday, May 3rd, 2017
Nash Point Lighthouse, South Wales. From the series 'The Sixth Extinction'.

Nash Point Lighthouse, South Wales. From the series ‘The Sixth Extinction’.

The above print has been selected for the University of Exeter Open Exhibition. Subtitled ‘Observatory: Perspectives on Landscape, Society and Spirit’ the exhibition called for artists to link their submission with research undertaken at The University. This image of the lighthouse at Nash Point, South Wales is from my project ‘The Sixth Extinction’ and responds to research into mass extinction events by the Earth System Science Group at Exeter.

‘The Sixth Extinction’ tracks a group of world-leading paleogeologists as they hunt for clues to a mass extinction event in the cliffs of North Somerset and South Wales. This image of Nash Point lighthouse (the observatory) shows the ‘extinction line’ at waist height in the cliffs – a rarely exposed inch-thick layer of limestone below which fossils are abundant but above which 75% of the planet’s species vanish. The lighthouse looks not only out over the lethal cliffs and reefs but also back through layers of deep time.

The exhibition runs in the Exeter Forum at the University from June 11 – 18.

‘The Sixth Extinction’ series selected to be shown as part of ESPY awards

Thursday, November 19th, 2015

‘The Sixth Extinction’ series has been selected to be showcased on a video screen in the Elysium Gallery, Swansea as part of the ESPY awards.

The jetstream over the North Atlantic controls the direction of pressure systems and hence the UK's weather. Atmospheric cooling due to the melting icecaps has altered the position of the jetstream leading to marked changes to weather patterns with increased storm intensity, flooding and more frequent extreme weather events.

Waterlogged fields, Monkton, South Wales. The jetstream over the North Atlantic controls the direction of pressure systems and hence the UK’s weather. Atmospheric cooling due to the melting icecaps has altered the position of the jetstream leading to marked changes to weather patterns with increased storm intensity, flooding and more frequent extreme weather events.

 

 

Prints from ‘The Sixth Extinction’ in exhibition at New York Hall of Science

Monday, September 21st, 2015
Port Talbot Steelworks & Kenfig Dunes, South Wales

Port Talbot steelworks & Kenfig Dunes, South Wales. The sand dunes here were once part of the largest dune system in Europe, the shifting sand supporting many species. However with the dunes now overstabilised and overgrown with marram grass, many of those species have become extinct.


Two prints from my ‘Sixth Extinction’ series are being shown at the New York Hall of Science, NY, as part of the Art & Science Collaboration’s exhibition called  ‘Biodiversity/Extinction’. The exhibition runs from 10th October 2015  to 28th February 2016.

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Bamboo (Six Seconds) – a new series

Thursday, May 19th, 2011

Untitled I, from the series Bamboo (Six Seconds)

Every six seconds fifteen acres of the planet are deforested. That’s 60,000 sqm, or six hectares, or nine football pitches. Every six seconds….the time it’s taken you to read these words. Shot in a bamboo forest in Anhui Province, China, the exposure time of each of these images is six seconds.

For the Chinese bamboo holds iconic status, representing the harmony between nature and man – and symbolising civilisation. In folklore, literature, calligraphy and painting bamboo’s characteristics embody the finest human virtues – integrity, humility and purity. Comparing a person to bamboo is the highest possible praise of their character.

Touted as a miracle crop to counter deforestation, bamboo is one of the fastest growing plants on earth. Growing up to four feet a day, one hectare of bamboo sequesters sixty-two tons of carbon dioxide per year. Generating up to 35% more oxygen than an equivalent stand of trees it can be used to produce everything from food, fabrics, paper, building material and oil.

However rising demand from the west has brought new environmental concerns for bamboo forests. Increased use of unregulated pesticides for production plus the strong chemical solvents required to process the bamboo have poisoned watercourses and threaten precious animal habitat. Indiscriminate harvesting has resulted in half the world’s species of bamboo now being in imminent danger of extinction.

For more from the series go to my portfolio website here, or on this permanent gallery page on this blog.