Posts Tagged ‘environment’

More work from the ‘sanctuary’ project

Sunday, October 22nd, 2017

Shot entirely on an iphone 5s using the hipstamatic app, these images are from the second part of this ongoing project. A very personal series of images shot mainly in Devon and Cornwall. More soon…

University of Exeter Open Exhibition – ‘Observatory: Perspectives on Landscape, Society and Spirit’

Thursday, June 1st, 2017
Nash Point Lighthouse, South Wales. From the series 'The Sixth Extinction'

Nash Point Lighthouse, South Wales. From the series ‘The Sixth Extinction’

This print has been selected for the University of Exeter Open Exhibition. Subtitled ‘Observatory: Perspectives on Landscape, Society and Spirit’ the exhibition called for artists to link their submission with research undertaken at The University. This image of the lighthouse at Nash Point, South Wales is from my project ‘The Sixth Extinction’ and responds to research into mass extinction events by the Earth System Science Group at Exeter University.

‘The Sixth Extinction’ tracks a group of world-leading paleogeologists as they hunt for clues to a mass extinction event in the cliffs of North Somerset and South Wales. This image of Nash Point lighthouse (the observatory) shows the ‘extinction line’ at waist height in the cliffs – a rarely exposed inch-thick layer of limestone below which fossils are abundant but above which 75% of the planet’s species vanish. The lighthouse looks not only out over the lethal cliffs and reefs but also back through layers of deep time.

The exhibition runs in the Exeter Forum at the University from June 11 – 18.

A selection of images from a new project – ‘Sanctuary’. Shot entirely using the Hipstamatic App on an Iphone

Sunday, March 12th, 2017

Sanctuary

I found myself walking local paths, seeking solace from the pain of bereavement. From a loss that had left my relationship with nature fractured and bruised. My partner walks beside me, our unspoken thoughts colliding like tectonic plates.

Heavy steps lead us down sinuous paths to the woodlands and we become immersed in the undergrowth, in the shady spinneys and thickets. A sanctuary of sorts. Far off sunlight draws us on, always just out of reach beyond the latticework of leaves and tangle of branches.

Photographed mostly on paths and in woodlands on Dartmoor in Devon and on Bodmin Moor in Cornwall. Shot entirely using the Hipstamatic app on an Iphone.

Installation view of exhibition at Terre Verte Gallery, Cornwall

Friday, September 30th, 2016

Installation shots from my current exhibition ‘The Practice of the Wild’ at Terre Verte Gallery, Altarnun, Cornwall UK. It features four prints from the ‘Huangshan Ltd’ series, a wallpaper collage of four images from ‘Bamboo (Six Seconds)’, six prints from ‘Sixth Extinction’ and two prints from ‘Sound of Jura’.

‘Bamboo (Six Seconds)’ project featured in Orion Magazine

Wednesday, April 1st, 2015

 

A bamboo forest in China from the project on deforestation and bamboo production called Bamboo (Six Seconds) featured in Orion Magazine by photographer Jon Wyatt

 

Orion Magazine is one of the oldest and most respected environmental and cultural magazines in the US and their May/June issue which is out today features my ‘Bamboo (Six Seconds)’ project. The images are beautifully laid out over five pages in a great looking edition ( I would say that..) which also includes, for those of you into the language of landscape, an extract from Robert Macfarlane’s new book, Landmarks.

Every image in the ‘Bamboo (Six Seconds)’ project has an exposure time of six seconds. This idea came from a quote I read that every six seconds fifteen acres of the planet is deforested. The full project statement continues:-

To the Chinese, bamboo holds iconic status, representing the harmony between nature and man – and symbolising civilisation. In myths, literature, calligraphy and painting bamboo’s characteristics embody the finest human virtues – integrity, humility and purity. Comparing a person to bamboo is considered the highest possible praise of their character.

Touted as a miracle crop to counter deforestation, bamboo is one of the fastest growing plants on earth. Growing up to four feet a day, one hectare of bamboo sequesters sixty-two tons of carbon dioxide per year. Generating up to 35% more oxygen than an equivalent stand of trees it can be used to produce everything from food, fabrics, paper, building material and oil.

However rising demand from the west has brought new environmental concerns for bamboo forests. Increased use of unregulated pesticides for production plus the strong chemical solvents required to process the bamboo have poisoned watercourses and threaten precious animal habitat. Indiscriminate harvesting has resulted in half the world’s species of bamboo now being in imminent danger of extinction.

A bamboo forest in China from the project on deforestation and bamboo production called Bamboo (Six Seconds) featured in Orion Magazine by photographer Jon Wyatt

.

Bamboo (Six Seconds) – a new series

Thursday, May 19th, 2011

Untitled I, from the series Bamboo (Six Seconds)

Every six seconds fifteen acres of the planet are deforested. That’s 60,000 sqm, or six hectares, or nine football pitches. Every six seconds….the time it’s taken you to read these words. Shot in a bamboo forest in Anhui Province, China, the exposure time of each of these images is six seconds.

For the Chinese bamboo holds iconic status, representing the harmony between nature and man – and symbolising civilisation. In folklore, literature, calligraphy and painting bamboo’s characteristics embody the finest human virtues – integrity, humility and purity. Comparing a person to bamboo is the highest possible praise of their character.

Touted as a miracle crop to counter deforestation, bamboo is one of the fastest growing plants on earth. Growing up to four feet a day, one hectare of bamboo sequesters sixty-two tons of carbon dioxide per year. Generating up to 35% more oxygen than an equivalent stand of trees it can be used to produce everything from food, fabrics, paper, building material and oil.

However rising demand from the west has brought new environmental concerns for bamboo forests. Increased use of unregulated pesticides for production plus the strong chemical solvents required to process the bamboo have poisoned watercourses and threaten precious animal habitat. Indiscriminate harvesting has resulted in half the world’s species of bamboo now being in imminent danger of extinction.

For more from the series go to my portfolio website here, or on this permanent gallery page on this blog.

Huangshan Ltd – a new series

Wednesday, May 18th, 2011

Huangshan Ltd - a new series

Huangshan Ltd

Huangshan (literally ‘Yellow Mountain’) in Anhui province is one of China’s most iconic national monuments. A range of mountains with 72 granite peaks and covering nearly 300 sq.km, the ‘Mount Huangshan Scenic Area’ is a UNESCO World Heritage Site providing habitats for rare and threatened species. One of China’s top tourist destinations, its iconic beauty ranks with the Yangtze River and the Great Wall as a potent cultural and spiritual symbol. A ‘sister’ national park of Yosemite in the US, Huangshan has inspired centuries of painters, poets and scholars becoming known to the Chinese as ‘the number one mountain under heaven’. It is particularly renowned for the gossamer threads of ethereal mist that drape the mountains and for the regular phenomenon by which those mists dramatically converge into dense ‘seas’ of cloud which surge and billow between the peaks.

The entire Mount Huangshan Scenic Area is owned and managed by the ‘Huangshan Tourism & Development Company Ltd’ and is listed on the Shanghai Stock Exchange. China’s decades of rapid economic reforms and the unwillingness of central government to allocate money and resources to such areas has led to this process of privatisation. It’s a model that is being widely replicated for other iconic spiritual and historic sites, from Shaolin temples to sections of the Great Wall.

In this series of photographs, Huangshan’s seas of cloud become an allegory for the process of privatization of an iconic landscape. The mist builds, converging into a sea of cloud that blankets the peaks, and finally disperses. Photographed in a style resonant of traditional Chinese ink drawings, the clouds denote the growing rift between a nation and a landscape once revered as the inspiration for the Chinese collective national identity.

 

Huangshan Ltd - a new series

The full series of images from this project can now be seen on my portfolio website here or on this permanent gallery page on this blog.