Archive for the ‘The Sixth Extinction’ Category

Selected for University of Exeter Open Exhibition – ‘Observatory: Perspectives on Landscape, Society and Spirit’

Wednesday, May 3rd, 2017
Nash Point Lighthouse, South Wales. From the series 'The Sixth Extinction'.

Nash Point Lighthouse, South Wales. From the series ‘The Sixth Extinction’.

The above print has been selected for the University of Exeter Open Exhibition. Subtitled ‘Observatory: Perspectives on Landscape, Society and Spirit’ the exhibition called for artists to link their submission with research undertaken at The University. This image of the lighthouse at Nash Point, South Wales is from my project ‘The Sixth Extinction’ and responds to research into mass extinction events by the Earth System Science Group at Exeter.

‘The Sixth Extinction’ tracks a group of world-leading paleogeologists as they hunt for clues to a mass extinction event in the cliffs of North Somerset and South Wales. This image of Nash Point lighthouse (the observatory) shows the ‘extinction line’ at waist height in the cliffs – a rarely exposed inch-thick layer of limestone below which fossils are abundant but above which 75% of the planet’s species vanish. The lighthouse looks not only out over the lethal cliffs and reefs but also back through layers of deep time.

The exhibition runs in the Exeter Forum at the University from June 11 – 18.

Installation view of exhibition at Terre Verte Gallery, Cornwall

Friday, September 30th, 2016

Installation shots from my current exhibition ‘The Practice of the Wild’ at Terre Verte Gallery, Altarnun, Cornwall UK. It features four prints from the ‘Huangshan Ltd’ series, a wallpaper collage of four images from ‘Bamboo (Six Seconds)’, six prints from ‘Sixth Extinction’ and two prints from ‘Sound of Jura’.

‘The Sixth Extinction’ series selected to be shown as part of ESPY awards

Thursday, November 19th, 2015

‘The Sixth Extinction’ series has been selected to be showcased on a video screen in the Elysium Gallery, Swansea as part of the ESPY awards.

The jetstream over the North Atlantic controls the direction of pressure systems and hence the UK's weather. Atmospheric cooling due to the melting icecaps has altered the position of the jetstream leading to marked changes to weather patterns with increased storm intensity, flooding and more frequent extreme weather events.

Waterlogged fields, Monkton, South Wales. The jetstream over the North Atlantic controls the direction of pressure systems and hence the UK’s weather. Atmospheric cooling due to the melting icecaps has altered the position of the jetstream leading to marked changes to weather patterns with increased storm intensity, flooding and more frequent extreme weather events.