Archive for the ‘Environmental issues’ Category

University of Exeter Open Exhibition – ‘Observatory: Perspectives on Landscape, Society and Spirit’

Thursday, June 1st, 2017
Nash Point Lighthouse, South Wales. From the series 'The Sixth Extinction'

Nash Point Lighthouse, South Wales. From the series ‘The Sixth Extinction’

This print has been selected for the University of Exeter Open Exhibition. Subtitled ‘Observatory: Perspectives on Landscape, Society and Spirit’ the exhibition called for artists to link their submission with research undertaken at The University. This image of the lighthouse at Nash Point, South Wales is from my project ‘The Sixth Extinction’ and responds to research into mass extinction events by the Earth System Science Group at Exeter University.

‘The Sixth Extinction’ tracks a group of world-leading paleogeologists as they hunt for clues to a mass extinction event in the cliffs of North Somerset and South Wales. This image of Nash Point lighthouse (the observatory) shows the ‘extinction line’ at waist height in the cliffs – a rarely exposed inch-thick layer of limestone below which fossils are abundant but above which 75% of the planet’s species vanish. The lighthouse looks not only out over the lethal cliffs and reefs but also back through layers of deep time.

The exhibition runs in the Exeter Forum at the University from June 11 – 18.

A selection of images from a new project – ‘Sanctuary’. Shot entirely using the Hipstamatic App on an Iphone

Sunday, March 12th, 2017

Sanctuary

I found myself walking local paths, seeking solace from the pain of bereavement. From a loss that had left my relationship with nature fractured and bruised. My partner walks beside me, our unspoken thoughts colliding like tectonic plates.

Heavy steps lead us down sinuous paths to the woodlands and we become immersed in the undergrowth, in the shady spinneys and thickets. A sanctuary of sorts. Far off sunlight draws us on, always just out of reach beyond the latticework of leaves and tangle of branches.

Photographed mostly on paths and in woodlands on Dartmoor in Devon and on Bodmin Moor in Cornwall. Shot entirely using the Hipstamatic app on an Iphone.

Installation view of exhibition at Terre Verte Gallery, Cornwall

Friday, September 30th, 2016

Installation shots from my current exhibition ‘The Practice of the Wild’ at Terre Verte Gallery, Altarnun, Cornwall UK. It features four prints from the ‘Huangshan Ltd’ series, a wallpaper collage of four images from ‘Bamboo (Six Seconds)’, six prints from ‘Sixth Extinction’ and two prints from ‘Sound of Jura’.

Exhibition in Cornwall, UK

Saturday, August 27th, 2016
Wallpaper with images from my project Bamboo (Six Seconds).

Wallpaper featuring images from Bamboo (Six Seconds)

The Terre Verte Gallery in Altarnun, Cornwall  is showing pieces from three of my projects as part of a three photographer exhibition entitled ‘The Practice of the Wild’. Named after the seminal 1990 book of essays by Gary Snyder – one of the central texts on wilderness and the interaction of nature and culture – all three photographers interpret the theme in their individual ways.

I will be showing a wallpaper collage (above) of four images from my project ‘Bamboo (Six Seconds)’. The single roll of Photo Tex is 64 inches wide by 57 inches high. There will also be four framed silver gelatin limited edition prints from ‘Huangshan Ltd’, six framed prints from ‘The Sixth Extinction’ and two prints from the series ‘Sound of Jura’.

The exhibition will run from 20th September until 15th October and I will be giving a talk on my work and, with the other photographers, will be leading group photography walks locally.

Press Release:- Apprehensions: Eamon Mac Mahon, Jon Wyatt, Chris Bennett

Thursday, November 19th, 2015

At this time of increasing ecological crisis, new Circuit Gallery exhibition asks us to consider our place in, and relationship to, the wider natural world.

Toronto, ON, November 17, 2015 — Circuit Gallery is pleased to present Apprehensions, an exhibition featuring new photographic work by Eamon Mac Mahon (Canada), Jon Wyatt (UK), and Chris Bennett (USA).

This exhibition brings together three artists who, in this time of increasing ecological crisis, are deeply engaged with landscape, and who ask us through these works to consider our place in, and relationship to, the wider natural world.

The Enlightenment concept of ‘man’ as an autonomous, self-conscious, and rational subject hinges on the separation of an ‘outside’ natural world from an ‘inner’ human and subjective one. With this separation in place, nature became seen as something external to discover, appreciate, and study. The ensuing modernist project mutated this view of the natural world into something for us to exploit, master and control for our own ends, in the name of progress, science, and reason. Paradoxically, nature has simultaneously been seen as so vast and resilient that it was safe from our depredations. Both of these ideas have failed us.

Apprehensions engages landscape both as a subject for photography and as a genre, where the traditional aesthetic categories of the beautiful and sublime, often synonymous with the landscape tradition in art, take on new resonances in our contemporary apprehending of, and affective orientation towards, the natural world.

This exhibition situates the work of these three photographers, and their different approaches to this genre, as having been predicated on and motivated by a profound and heightened awareness of our species’ contributing role in global warming and our unfolding catastrophe.

Landscape has always been an important genre and subject for photography. And it makes more sense now than ever that artists are reengaging traditional aesthetic categories and feel compelled to reevaluate our culture’s changed and increasingly fraught relationship with nature and to question our assumed place in the world.

Such art can open up the world and our relationship to it. It can destabilize and move us, reminding us that there are other ways of being in it.

The exhibition is curated by Claire Sykes with an essay by Leo Hsu.

Fault Line XII

Fault Line XII

 

Bios:-

Eamon Mac Mahon is an artist working with photography and video based in Toronto. Raised in northern Alberta, his fascination with the wilderness began at an early age. Mac Mahon’s photographs have been published by the Walrus, National Geographic, Capricious, MIT Press and the New Yorker. His work has been exhibited at the Art Gallery of Ontario, Detroit Institute of Arts and the Power Plant. He is represented by Circuit Gallery (Toronto).

British photographer Jon Wyatt‘s work documents the detachment of modern culture from our physical landscapes, both in the context of landscape iconography, national identity, human ecology and ecosystem transition; and through the perspective of vast spans of time and geologic processes. His work has been published in PDN, National Geographic Traveler, Orion Magazine and The Times amongst others and exhibited in Europe, South East Asia, the United States, and Canada.

Chris Bennett is an American photographer based in Portland, Oregon. He received his BFA from Indiana University in 1999 and his MFA in Photography, from the Hartford Art School, University of Hartford, in 2014. Bennett’s work has been shown widely, with exhibitions in Portland at Froelick Gallery, Camerawork Gallery, and the Oregon Historical Society; as well as nationally and internationally at The Phoenix Art Museum (AZ), Center for Contemporary Art (Santa Fe, NM), INOVA – Institute of Visual Arts (Milwaukee, WI), Camera Club of New York (New York, NY), and Kominek Gallery (Berlin, Germany).

Leo Hsu is a writer, researcher and photographer based in Toronto. He is a regular contributor to Fraction Magazine and holds a PhD in Anthropology and Certificate in Culture and Media from New York University. He has taught on the history of photography and documentary photography at Carnegie Mellon University and collaborated with the Silver Eye Center for Photography on several exhibitions, most recently A World Imagined: Kelli Connell and Sara Macel.

Apprehensions runs November 26 through December 19 at Circuit Gallery @ Prefix ICA, with an opening reception on Thursday, November 26, from 6 – 9 p.m.

Apprehensions

Eamon Mac Mahon
Jon Wyatt
Chris Bennett

November 26 – December 19, 2015

Opening Reception:

Thursday, November 26, 6-9 p.m.

Circuit Gallery @ Prefix ICA
401 Richmond Street West, Suite 124
Toronto, ON, M6R 2G5

[ Google Map ]

Gallery Hours:
Tuesday – Saturday, 11:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.

Visit Circuit Gallery online for more information and to see more images:
www.circuitgallery.com/exhibitions

About Circuit Gallery

Circuit Gallery specializes in contemporary photography. Established in 2008 by Susana Reisman and Claire Sykes, the Toronto based commercial gallery represents both emerging and established Canadian and international artists.

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For more information and media inquiries, please contact:
Claire Sykes, Circuit Gallery, claire@circuitgallery.com, Tel: 647-477-2487

‘The Sixth Extinction’ series selected to be shown as part of ESPY awards

Thursday, November 19th, 2015

‘The Sixth Extinction’ series has been selected to be showcased on a video screen in the Elysium Gallery, Swansea as part of the ESPY awards.

The jetstream over the North Atlantic controls the direction of pressure systems and hence the UK's weather. Atmospheric cooling due to the melting icecaps has altered the position of the jetstream leading to marked changes to weather patterns with increased storm intensity, flooding and more frequent extreme weather events.

Waterlogged fields, Monkton, South Wales. The jetstream over the North Atlantic controls the direction of pressure systems and hence the UK’s weather. Atmospheric cooling due to the melting icecaps has altered the position of the jetstream leading to marked changes to weather patterns with increased storm intensity, flooding and more frequent extreme weather events.

 

 

‘Fault Line’ project to be exhibited at Prefix Institute of Contemporary Art, Toronto

Thursday, September 17th, 2015

 

Fault Line VI - Climbing vines in Samoa, from the project Fault Line by photographer Jon Wyatt

Fault Line VI

I’m pleased to announce that Circuit Gallery at the Prefix Institute of Contemporary Art in Toronto will be exhibiting images from my Fault Line series. The exhibition will open on November 26th and continue until December 19th 2015. Also exhibiting will be Canadian photographer Eamon Mac Mahon and Christopher Bennett from the US, both also represented by Circuit Gallery. More details to follow.

 

Fault Line XIV (detail) - Climbing vines in Samoa, from the project Fault Line by photographer Jon Wyatt

Fault Line XIV (detail)

Panellist at Royal Geographical Society’s ‘Explore’ conference, London

Thursday, September 3rd, 2015

Just a quick note to say that I’ll be a panellist at this years Royal Geographical Society’s ‘Explore: expeditions and fieldwork planning 2015’ conference. The theme this year is ‘powerful places, quietly told’ and the workshop will be part of the ‘Communicating your Discoveries’ sessions.

Details:-
Royal Geographical Society (with IBG), London, UK
13-15 November 2015.

 

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‘Bamboo (Six Seconds)’ project featured in Orion Magazine

Wednesday, April 1st, 2015

 

A bamboo forest in China from the project on deforestation and bamboo production called Bamboo (Six Seconds) featured in Orion Magazine by photographer Jon Wyatt

 

Orion Magazine is one of the oldest and most respected environmental and cultural magazines in the US and their May/June issue which is out today features my ‘Bamboo (Six Seconds)’ project. The images are beautifully laid out over five pages in a great looking edition ( I would say that..) which also includes, for those of you into the language of landscape, an extract from Robert Macfarlane’s new book, Landmarks.

Every image in the ‘Bamboo (Six Seconds)’ project has an exposure time of six seconds. This idea came from a quote I read that every six seconds fifteen acres of the planet is deforested. The full project statement continues:-

To the Chinese, bamboo holds iconic status, representing the harmony between nature and man – and symbolising civilisation. In myths, literature, calligraphy and painting bamboo’s characteristics embody the finest human virtues – integrity, humility and purity. Comparing a person to bamboo is considered the highest possible praise of their character.

Touted as a miracle crop to counter deforestation, bamboo is one of the fastest growing plants on earth. Growing up to four feet a day, one hectare of bamboo sequesters sixty-two tons of carbon dioxide per year. Generating up to 35% more oxygen than an equivalent stand of trees it can be used to produce everything from food, fabrics, paper, building material and oil.

However rising demand from the west has brought new environmental concerns for bamboo forests. Increased use of unregulated pesticides for production plus the strong chemical solvents required to process the bamboo have poisoned watercourses and threaten precious animal habitat. Indiscriminate harvesting has resulted in half the world’s species of bamboo now being in imminent danger of extinction.

A bamboo forest in China from the project on deforestation and bamboo production called Bamboo (Six Seconds) featured in Orion Magazine by photographer Jon Wyatt

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New work: ‘Fault Line’

Friday, March 27th, 2015

Climbing vines in Samoa, from the project Fault Line by photographer Jon Wyatt

Civilisation exists by geological consent, subject to change without notice. – Will Durant.

On the wall is a bathymetric map – a map of the topography of a section of the Pacific Ocean floor 2,500 miles east of Australia. Intricate, black wrinkles spread across the map denoting the contours and pressure ridges of the ocean landscape. At a depth of 11 miles those contours coalesce to form a thick, dark crease across the map. At this spot the Pacific tectonic plate dives below the Australian plate at an average of 10 inches per year – by far the fastest plate movement on the planet.

In 2009, in a massive fault rupture, the plates moved 22 feet relative to each other for a distance of 155 miles. The resulting wave was 55 feet high when it hit the nearest coastline – the island of Samoa, 100 miles to the north. It killed 189 people, destroyed 20 villages and left 3000 homeless.

Climbing vines in Samoa, from the project Fault Line by photographer Jon Wyatt

Detail from above image

Visiting Samoa in 2014, I’m struck by the swathes of vegetation that rise, several storeys high, from the roadsides. Comprising one single species – Merremia Peltata – this fast-growing climbing vine with broad, waxy leaves has smothered and killed more than 60% of Samoa’s native forest. The contours of the carpet of vines recalls the contours of the ocean floor map. An inundation of vegetation. A palpable echo of the tsunami.

Climbing vines in Samoa, from the project Fault Line by photographer Jon Wyatt.

Sixth Extinction project is featured in ‘Another Place’ magazine

Saturday, January 31st, 2015
Dunraven Bay, South Wales. The large 'imbricated' boulders scattered above the high tide mark are evidence of the UK's largest natural disaster. In 1607 a 25-foot high tsunami swept up the Bristol Channel killing 3000 people and flooding a 200 square mile wide area in North Somerset and South Wales

Dunraven Bay, South Wales. The large ‘imbricated’ boulders scattered above the high tide mark are evidence of the UK’s largest natural disaster. In 1607 a 25-foot high tsunami swept up the Bristol Channel killing 3000 people and flooding a 200 square mile wide area in North Somerset and South Wales

‘The Sixth Extinction’ project is featured this week in the ‘Another Place’ contemporary photography magazine on tumblr – here.  The project concerns ecosystem transition and is loosely based around the investigations of a group of scientists into a 200 million year old mystery – a mass extinction event which wiped out around 80% of all life on earth.

PDN Magazine Interview

Friday, January 13th, 2012

Untitled IV from the series 'Huangshan Ltd'

I was recently interviewed by Conor Risch, editor of respected US-based photography magazine PDN (Photo District News). The interview is published in the March 2012 issue of the magazine. We discuss the ‘Huangshan Ltd’ project in particular and the framework behind my work. The magazine will be featuring five images from the series. You can read the interview and see the gallery of images here. Alternatively you can download the pdf of the interview here.

Newsletter – September 2011

Saturday, October 1st, 2011

Untitled VII, from the series Huangshan Ltd - Jon Wyatt Photography Newsletter - September 2011 Untitled I, from the series Huangshan Ltd - Jon Wyatt Photography Newsletter - September 2011

Untitled X, from the series Huangshan Ltd - Jon Wyatt Photography Newsletter - September 2011  Untitled II, from the series Huangshan Ltd - Jon Wyatt Photography Newsletter - September 2011

From the series ‘Huangshan Ltd

  • The ‘Huangshan Ltd’ series is now available as limited edition digital bromide prints from the Diemar/Noble Gallery in London. Edition sizes are 45 x 36ins (ed. of 3) and 24 x 20ins (ed. of 7).
  • The ‘Bamboo (Six Seconds) series has been selected to be shown as part of the ‘Open Here’ exhibition at the Hereford Photography Festival throughout November. The exhibitions selection panel included Simon Bainbridge, editor of BJP and Melissa deWitt, editor of Hotshoe.
  • A print from the ‘Bamboo (Six Seconds)’ series will be auctioned at an event at the Hotshoe Gallery in London on the 7th October. Organised by the Hereford Photography Festival, the prints will be on display at the gallery from 3rd October. Other contributors include Martin Parr and Simon Roberts.
  • Images from the ‘Sound of Jura’ series are currently being shown at 10GS in Mayfair, London as part of an exhibition entitled ‘Luminance’. The private view is on the 2nd November and also features work by Wendy Pye and Judith Lyons.

Untitled III, from the series Sound of Jura Untitled V, from the series Sound of Jura

Untitled VI, from the series Sound of Jura Untitled IV, from the series Sound of Jura

From the series ‘Sound of Jura’

  • Jon Wyatt Photography has a new facebook page for all the latest news on images, exhibitions and photographic wanderings. Check out www.facebook.com/jonwyattphotography and hit that ‘like’ button.
  • Jonwyatt.co.uk is now fully available on all mobile devices, the new versions being Ipad and smartphone compatible.
  • Printed versions of my two recent Chinese series – ‘Bamboo (Six Seconds)’ and ‘Huangshan Ltd’ – are now available as self-published 11 x 8 inch booklets from Magcloud.
  • On a more commercial angle I have been selected (for the second year running) for Luerzer’s Archive’s ‘200 Best Advertising Photographers 2011/2012’. The publication will feature several pages of my work.
  • Elsewhere over the last few months work has been featured on Harry Hardie’s ‘Here’ blog; alongside an interview on E-photoreview; as editors picks on the Behance Network and Adweek’s talent gallery; Shots Magazine; shown in the exhibition ‘Transience’ at Galerie Huit as part of Les Rencontres d’Arles Festival; and as part of the Association of Photographers Gallery ‘Collectives’ Print Sales.

Untitled I, from the series Bamboo (Six Seconds) Untitled II, from the series Bamboo (Six Seconds)

Untitled III, from the series Bamboo (Six Seconds) Untitled IV, from the series Bamboo (Six Seconds)

From the series ‘Bamboo (Six Seconds)

Limited Edition Prints now available from Diemar/Noble Gallery, London

Wednesday, July 20th, 2011

Untitled II from the series 'Huangshan Ltd'

I’m very pleased to announce that I’ll be working with the Diemar/Noble Gallery in London. (Update: now known as the L.A. Noble Gallery). They are currently displaying a 45 x 36 inch framed print of this image from the ‘Huangshan Ltd’ series.

The series comprises ten images. Limited edition prints will be available in two sizes  – 45 x 36 inches, in an edition of three & 24 x 20 inches, in an edition of seven.

 

Bamboo (Six Seconds) featured on hereontheweb.co.uk blog

Friday, May 20th, 2011

Untitled III from the series 'Bamboo (Six Seconds)' - featured on hereontheweb.co.uk blog

Hereontheweb.co.uk (now Herepress.org) is the new(ish) blog from photo editor, writer and curator Harry Hardie. Until recently Exhibitions Director at Host Gallery/Foto8 in London, Harry is now director of ‘Here’, a company that publishes, exhibits, teaches and supports photography. He is featuring the ‘Bamboo (Six Seconds)’ project.

Bamboo (Six Seconds) – a new series

Thursday, May 19th, 2011

Untitled I, from the series Bamboo (Six Seconds)

Every six seconds fifteen acres of the planet are deforested. That’s 60,000 sqm, or six hectares, or nine football pitches. Every six seconds….the time it’s taken you to read these words. Shot in a bamboo forest in Anhui Province, China, the exposure time of each of these images is six seconds.

For the Chinese bamboo holds iconic status, representing the harmony between nature and man – and symbolising civilisation. In folklore, literature, calligraphy and painting bamboo’s characteristics embody the finest human virtues – integrity, humility and purity. Comparing a person to bamboo is the highest possible praise of their character.

Touted as a miracle crop to counter deforestation, bamboo is one of the fastest growing plants on earth. Growing up to four feet a day, one hectare of bamboo sequesters sixty-two tons of carbon dioxide per year. Generating up to 35% more oxygen than an equivalent stand of trees it can be used to produce everything from food, fabrics, paper, building material and oil.

However rising demand from the west has brought new environmental concerns for bamboo forests. Increased use of unregulated pesticides for production plus the strong chemical solvents required to process the bamboo have poisoned watercourses and threaten precious animal habitat. Indiscriminate harvesting has resulted in half the world’s species of bamboo now being in imminent danger of extinction.

For more from the series go to my portfolio website here, or on this permanent gallery page on this blog.

Huangshan Ltd – a new series

Wednesday, May 18th, 2011

Huangshan Ltd - a new series

Huangshan Ltd

Huangshan (literally ‘Yellow Mountain’) in Anhui province is one of China’s most iconic national monuments. A range of mountains with 72 granite peaks and covering nearly 300 sq.km, the ‘Mount Huangshan Scenic Area’ is a UNESCO World Heritage Site providing habitats for rare and threatened species. One of China’s top tourist destinations, its iconic beauty ranks with the Yangtze River and the Great Wall as a potent cultural and spiritual symbol. A ‘sister’ national park of Yosemite in the US, Huangshan has inspired centuries of painters, poets and scholars becoming known to the Chinese as ‘the number one mountain under heaven’. It is particularly renowned for the gossamer threads of ethereal mist that drape the mountains and for the regular phenomenon by which those mists dramatically converge into dense ‘seas’ of cloud which surge and billow between the peaks.

The entire Mount Huangshan Scenic Area is owned and managed by the ‘Huangshan Tourism & Development Company Ltd’ and is listed on the Shanghai Stock Exchange. China’s decades of rapid economic reforms and the unwillingness of central government to allocate money and resources to such areas has led to this process of privatisation. It’s a model that is being widely replicated for other iconic spiritual and historic sites, from Shaolin temples to sections of the Great Wall.

In this series of photographs, Huangshan’s seas of cloud become an allegory for the process of privatization of an iconic landscape. The mist builds, converging into a sea of cloud that blankets the peaks, and finally disperses. Photographed in a style resonant of traditional Chinese ink drawings, the clouds denote the growing rift between a nation and a landscape once revered as the inspiration for the Chinese collective national identity.

 

Huangshan Ltd - a new series

The full series of images from this project can now be seen on my portfolio website here or on this permanent gallery page on this blog.

Artist Statement

Saturday, March 26th, 2011

My two recent projects – ‘Huangshan Ltd’ and ‘Bamboo (Six Seconds)’ – mark a slight shift in emphasis in my work – though the progression to this point is clear from a stroll through my ‘generic’ portfolios – ‘land’, ‘sea’ etc. Both projects also share a framework which I intend to continue to pursue in the future. Below is my ‘artist statement’ which should explain all.

Artist Statement

Historically cultures have turned to their natural environment as a source of inspiration for collective identification. Myths, memories and cultural virtues are projected onto the landscape which acquires iconic status, becoming imbued with moral and spiritual significance. Increasingly though, these bonds between a culture and its physical landscape are becoming eroded as we adapt the environment to our own ends rather than allowing it to shape who we are.

My work documents this rift, using natural ‘tools’ within the landscape to articulate this growing spiritual and cultural detachment. These devices have included invasive vines (Fault Line), atmospheric phenomena (Huangshan Ltd) and time itself (Bamboo (Six Seconds)). Hushed rhythms of meditative beauty are used to engage the viewer with disquieting issues and ideas, asking them to re-evaluate our culture’s changed and fraught relationship with the land. Powerful places are quietly told, the landscapes mediated by unease. The projects, through the lens of landscape iconography, address issues of conservation and ecology, ecosystem transition and the ethics of land use and ownership.

 

www.jonwyatt.co.uk

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Exhibition and Private View, Kendal Mountain Film Festival

Saturday, September 12th, 2009

Exhibition and Private View, Kendal Mountain Film Festival

The Warehouse Gallery in Kendal, Cumbria, is pleased to announce an exhibition by award-winning photographer Jon Wyatt. As part of the renowned Kendal Mountain Film Festival, he will be showing editioned prints from his series entitled ‘Naked’.

Photographed in mountain ranges across Europe, Greenland and North America, the prints feature isolated figures in dramatic, winter mountain landscapes. They are alone, exposed and vulnerable (ie naked) in these extreme and primal environments.

The images stand as a howl for the preservation of these ecosystems, and have received honours in both the Prix de la Photographie, Paris and IPA Awards.

You are invited to a private view on Friday 30th October and the exhibition will run until Sunday 22nd November.

The whole series can be viewed at www.jonwyatt.co.uk/portfolio