Archive for the ‘Destinations’ Category

More work from the ‘sanctuary’ project

Sunday, October 22nd, 2017

Shot entirely on an iphone 5s using the hipstamatic app, these images are from the second part of this ongoing project. A very personal series of images shot mainly in Devon and Cornwall. More soon…

A selection of images from a new project – ‘Sanctuary’. Shot entirely using the Hipstamatic App on an Iphone

Sunday, March 12th, 2017

Sanctuary

I found myself walking local paths, seeking solace from the pain of bereavement. From a loss that had left my relationship with nature fractured and bruised. My partner walks beside me, our unspoken thoughts colliding like tectonic plates.

Heavy steps lead us down sinuous paths to the woodlands and we become immersed in the undergrowth, in the shady spinneys and thickets. A sanctuary of sorts. Far off sunlight draws us on, always just out of reach beyond the latticework of leaves and tangle of branches.

Photographed mostly on paths and in woodlands on Dartmoor in Devon and on Bodmin Moor in Cornwall. Shot entirely using the Hipstamatic app on an Iphone.

Exhibition in Cornwall, UK

Saturday, August 27th, 2016
Wallpaper with images from my project Bamboo (Six Seconds).

Wallpaper featuring images from Bamboo (Six Seconds)

The Terre Verte Gallery in Altarnun, Cornwall  is showing pieces from three of my projects as part of a three photographer exhibition entitled ‘The Practice of the Wild’. Named after the seminal 1990 book of essays by Gary Snyder – one of the central texts on wilderness and the interaction of nature and culture – all three photographers interpret the theme in their individual ways.

I will be showing a wallpaper collage (above) of four images from my project ‘Bamboo (Six Seconds)’. The single roll of Photo Tex is 64 inches wide by 57 inches high. There will also be four framed silver gelatin limited edition prints from ‘Huangshan Ltd’, six framed prints from ‘The Sixth Extinction’ and two prints from the series ‘Sound of Jura’.

The exhibition will run from 20th September until 15th October and I will be giving a talk on my work and, with the other photographers, will be leading group photography walks locally.

Recent iphone hipstamatic images

Sunday, June 12th, 2016

I’ve taken a bit of a sabbatical recently for personal reasons, but I’ve always got my iphone on me and take images using the hipstamatic app. Walking, shooting and finding solace in the forests of Dartmoor and Bodmin Moor.

 

Prints from ‘The Sixth Extinction’ in exhibition at New York Hall of Science

Monday, September 21st, 2015
Port Talbot Steelworks & Kenfig Dunes, South Wales

Port Talbot steelworks & Kenfig Dunes, South Wales. The sand dunes here were once part of the largest dune system in Europe, the shifting sand supporting many species. However with the dunes now overstabilised and overgrown with marram grass, many of those species have become extinct.


Two prints from my ‘Sixth Extinction’ series are being shown at the New York Hall of Science, NY, as part of the Art & Science Collaboration’s exhibition called  ‘Biodiversity/Extinction’. The exhibition runs from 10th October 2015  to 28th February 2016.

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Panellist at Royal Geographical Society’s ‘Explore’ conference, London

Thursday, September 3rd, 2015

Just a quick note to say that I’ll be a panellist at this years Royal Geographical Society’s ‘Explore: expeditions and fieldwork planning 2015’ conference. The theme this year is ‘powerful places, quietly told’ and the workshop will be part of the ‘Communicating your Discoveries’ sessions.

Details:-
Royal Geographical Society (with IBG), London, UK
13-15 November 2015.

 

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‘Bamboo (Six Seconds)’ project featured in Orion Magazine

Wednesday, April 1st, 2015

 

A bamboo forest in China from the project on deforestation and bamboo production called Bamboo (Six Seconds) featured in Orion Magazine by photographer Jon Wyatt

 

Orion Magazine is one of the oldest and most respected environmental and cultural magazines in the US and their May/June issue which is out today features my ‘Bamboo (Six Seconds)’ project. The images are beautifully laid out over five pages in a great looking edition ( I would say that..) which also includes, for those of you into the language of landscape, an extract from Robert Macfarlane’s new book, Landmarks.

Every image in the ‘Bamboo (Six Seconds)’ project has an exposure time of six seconds. This idea came from a quote I read that every six seconds fifteen acres of the planet is deforested. The full project statement continues:-

To the Chinese, bamboo holds iconic status, representing the harmony between nature and man – and symbolising civilisation. In myths, literature, calligraphy and painting bamboo’s characteristics embody the finest human virtues – integrity, humility and purity. Comparing a person to bamboo is considered the highest possible praise of their character.

Touted as a miracle crop to counter deforestation, bamboo is one of the fastest growing plants on earth. Growing up to four feet a day, one hectare of bamboo sequesters sixty-two tons of carbon dioxide per year. Generating up to 35% more oxygen than an equivalent stand of trees it can be used to produce everything from food, fabrics, paper, building material and oil.

However rising demand from the west has brought new environmental concerns for bamboo forests. Increased use of unregulated pesticides for production plus the strong chemical solvents required to process the bamboo have poisoned watercourses and threaten precious animal habitat. Indiscriminate harvesting has resulted in half the world’s species of bamboo now being in imminent danger of extinction.

A bamboo forest in China from the project on deforestation and bamboo production called Bamboo (Six Seconds) featured in Orion Magazine by photographer Jon Wyatt

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New work: ‘Fault Line’

Friday, March 27th, 2015

Climbing vines in Samoa, from the project Fault Line by photographer Jon Wyatt

Civilisation exists by geological consent, subject to change without notice. – Will Durant.

On the wall is a bathymetric map – a map of the topography of a section of the Pacific Ocean floor 2,500 miles east of Australia. Intricate, black wrinkles spread across the map denoting the contours and pressure ridges of the ocean landscape. At a depth of 11 miles those contours coalesce to form a thick, dark crease across the map. At this spot the Pacific tectonic plate dives below the Australian plate at an average of 10 inches per year – by far the fastest plate movement on the planet.

In 2009, in a massive fault rupture, the plates moved 22 feet relative to each other for a distance of 155 miles. The resulting wave was 55 feet high when it hit the nearest coastline – the island of Samoa, 100 miles to the north. It killed 189 people, destroyed 20 villages and left 3000 homeless.

Climbing vines in Samoa, from the project Fault Line by photographer Jon Wyatt

Detail from above image

Visiting Samoa in 2014, I’m struck by the swathes of vegetation that rise, several storeys high, from the roadsides. Comprising one single species – Merremia Peltata – this fast-growing climbing vine with broad, waxy leaves has smothered and killed more than 60% of Samoa’s native forest. The contours of the carpet of vines recalls the contours of the ocean floor map. An inundation of vegetation. A palpable echo of the tsunami.

Climbing vines in Samoa, from the project Fault Line by photographer Jon Wyatt.

Sixth Extinction project is featured in ‘Another Place’ magazine

Saturday, January 31st, 2015
Dunraven Bay, South Wales. The large 'imbricated' boulders scattered above the high tide mark are evidence of the UK's largest natural disaster. In 1607 a 25-foot high tsunami swept up the Bristol Channel killing 3000 people and flooding a 200 square mile wide area in North Somerset and South Wales

Dunraven Bay, South Wales. The large ‘imbricated’ boulders scattered above the high tide mark are evidence of the UK’s largest natural disaster. In 1607 a 25-foot high tsunami swept up the Bristol Channel killing 3000 people and flooding a 200 square mile wide area in North Somerset and South Wales

‘The Sixth Extinction’ project is featured this week in the ‘Another Place’ contemporary photography magazine on tumblr – here.  The project concerns ecosystem transition and is loosely based around the investigations of a group of scientists into a 200 million year old mystery – a mass extinction event which wiped out around 80% of all life on earth.

New limited edition prints from Eye Buy Art

Sunday, December 9th, 2012
Ste-Foy-Tarentaise (2009). New limited edition prints from Eye Buy Art

Ste-Foy-Tarentaise, France (2009)

Two images from my ‘Naked’ (2009) series are being released as limited editions prints by Canadian online gallery Eye Buy Art (www.eyebuyart.com). Editions are available in several different sizes from 14 x 11 inches to 40 x 30 inches. The images available are ‘Ste-Foy-Tarentaise, France 2009’ and ‘Glacier d’Argentiere, Chamonix, France. 2009’. Eye Buy Art aim to encourage the collection of limited edition art by offering affordably priced editions.

Glacier-d'Argentiere (2009)

Glacier-d’Argentiere, Chamonix, France (2009). New limited edition prints from Eye Buy Art

Latest selection of hipstamatic landscape photography

Wednesday, October 3rd, 2012

A few of my latest iphone images culled from my files, using the hipstamatic app. One of my photolibraries, Gallery Stock, is shortly launching an iphone collection.

Commissions in Alaska and Norway

Friday, June 8th, 2012
Thompson Pass, near Valdez, Alaska

Thompson Pass, near Valdez, Alaska

I have recently returned from two trips shooting editorial commissions. The first was in Alaska where I spent the best part of a month in and around the Chugach Mountains in what turned out to be a record-breaking snowfall year.  The second trip was to the Lyngen Alps in northern Norway, around 200 miles inside the Arctic Circle. Based on a yacht exploring the fjords northwest of Tromso, the ‘land of the midnight sun’ kept its promise, delivering nearly 24 hours of daylight. Click here or on the image above to see some more images from both trips – the link will open my facebook page.

PDN Magazine Interview

Friday, January 13th, 2012

Untitled IV from the series 'Huangshan Ltd'

I was recently interviewed by Conor Risch, editor of respected US-based photography magazine PDN (Photo District News). The interview is published in the March 2012 issue of the magazine. We discuss the ‘Huangshan Ltd’ project in particular and the framework behind my work. The magazine will be featuring five images from the series. You can read the interview and see the gallery of images here. Alternatively you can download the pdf of the interview here.

Invited to take part in the Simon Norfolk Masterclass in Athens

Sunday, November 6th, 2011

I’ve been invited to take part in the ‘Simon Norfolk Masterclass’ as part of the Athens Photography Festival. Run by the Hellenic Centre for Photography in Athens it is sponsored by the British Council in Greece. The four day course begins on 11th November and I’m the only participant from the UK.

Showing work at the Rencontres d’Arles Photography Festival 2011

Friday, June 17th, 2011

Galerie Huit, Arles

Looking forward to the Rencontres d’Arles Photography Festival in early July. I’ll be showing three prints there as part of the Galerie Huit Open Salon show – two from the series Bamboo (Six Seconds) and one from the series Huangshan Ltd. Though that’s really a lame excuse for spending a week in the beautiful old town of Arles in the south of France, smothered in all things visual.

A highlight should be French graffiti artist/photographer JR’s closing night presentation. If you haven’t seen his inspiring 2011 TED Award prize speech then you really should – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0PAy1zBtTbw – on the subject of changing the world using art by, unlikely as it sounds, flyposting massive scale images.

Bamboo (Six Seconds) featured on hereontheweb.co.uk blog

Friday, May 20th, 2011

Untitled III from the series 'Bamboo (Six Seconds)' - featured on hereontheweb.co.uk blog

Hereontheweb.co.uk (now Herepress.org) is the new(ish) blog from photo editor, writer and curator Harry Hardie. Until recently Exhibitions Director at Host Gallery/Foto8 in London, Harry is now director of ‘Here’, a company that publishes, exhibits, teaches and supports photography. He is featuring the ‘Bamboo (Six Seconds)’ project.

Bamboo (Six Seconds) – a new series

Thursday, May 19th, 2011

Untitled I, from the series Bamboo (Six Seconds)

Every six seconds fifteen acres of the planet are deforested. That’s 60,000 sqm, or six hectares, or nine football pitches. Every six seconds….the time it’s taken you to read these words. Shot in a bamboo forest in Anhui Province, China, the exposure time of each of these images is six seconds.

For the Chinese bamboo holds iconic status, representing the harmony between nature and man – and symbolising civilisation. In folklore, literature, calligraphy and painting bamboo’s characteristics embody the finest human virtues – integrity, humility and purity. Comparing a person to bamboo is the highest possible praise of their character.

Touted as a miracle crop to counter deforestation, bamboo is one of the fastest growing plants on earth. Growing up to four feet a day, one hectare of bamboo sequesters sixty-two tons of carbon dioxide per year. Generating up to 35% more oxygen than an equivalent stand of trees it can be used to produce everything from food, fabrics, paper, building material and oil.

However rising demand from the west has brought new environmental concerns for bamboo forests. Increased use of unregulated pesticides for production plus the strong chemical solvents required to process the bamboo have poisoned watercourses and threaten precious animal habitat. Indiscriminate harvesting has resulted in half the world’s species of bamboo now being in imminent danger of extinction.

For more from the series go to my portfolio website here, or on this permanent gallery page on this blog.

Huangshan Ltd – a new series

Wednesday, May 18th, 2011

Huangshan Ltd - a new series

Huangshan Ltd

Huangshan (literally ‘Yellow Mountain’) in Anhui province is one of China’s most iconic national monuments. A range of mountains with 72 granite peaks and covering nearly 300 sq.km, the ‘Mount Huangshan Scenic Area’ is a UNESCO World Heritage Site providing habitats for rare and threatened species. One of China’s top tourist destinations, its iconic beauty ranks with the Yangtze River and the Great Wall as a potent cultural and spiritual symbol. A ‘sister’ national park of Yosemite in the US, Huangshan has inspired centuries of painters, poets and scholars becoming known to the Chinese as ‘the number one mountain under heaven’. It is particularly renowned for the gossamer threads of ethereal mist that drape the mountains and for the regular phenomenon by which those mists dramatically converge into dense ‘seas’ of cloud which surge and billow between the peaks.

The entire Mount Huangshan Scenic Area is owned and managed by the ‘Huangshan Tourism & Development Company Ltd’ and is listed on the Shanghai Stock Exchange. China’s decades of rapid economic reforms and the unwillingness of central government to allocate money and resources to such areas has led to this process of privatisation. It’s a model that is being widely replicated for other iconic spiritual and historic sites, from Shaolin temples to sections of the Great Wall.

In this series of photographs, Huangshan’s seas of cloud become an allegory for the process of privatization of an iconic landscape. The mist builds, converging into a sea of cloud that blankets the peaks, and finally disperses. Photographed in a style resonant of traditional Chinese ink drawings, the clouds denote the growing rift between a nation and a landscape once revered as the inspiration for the Chinese collective national identity.

 

Huangshan Ltd - a new series

The full series of images from this project can now be seen on my portfolio website here or on this permanent gallery page on this blog.

Isle of Jura in the Scottish Inner Hebrides

Saturday, January 8th, 2011

Isle of Jura in the Scottish Inner Hebrides

I’ve recently returned from 2 weeks on the Isle of Jura in the Scottish Inner Hebrides. Many thanks to Jane and Hugh who looked after us so well, their idyllic cottage providing stunning views of the Paps – ‘mountains’ rising to 785m at their highest point.

Isle of Jura in the Scottish Inner Hebrides

The island’s relatively small but boggy interior and remote nature (two ferries from the Scottish mainland) combined with extraordinary light, meant I found myself drawn to the views over the Sound of Jura. These are the straits separating the island from the Scottish mainland, which, draped in ethereal light, are known intriguingly in Gaelic as ‘An Linne Rosach’ –  ‘The Sound of Disappointment’. The full series is now up on my portfolio website.

Commission in Yangzhou, China

Saturday, October 2nd, 2010

The city of Yangzhou in eastern China has nearly three centuries of history and tradition which is colliding head-on with modern China’s current exponential growth. Commissioned by the City of Yangzhou to shoot this dichotomy from a western photographer’s perspective,  I witnessed how this small city by Chinese standards [in the UK it’d be our third largest city!] is embracing the rush for modernity whilst diligently (and perhaps, too enthusiastically) cultivating its rich heritage for the booming tourism market.

The images will form part of the Yangzhou Photo Festival in March 2011 and have been published in China Photo Press Magazine.